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About

Learn-2-Learn Game

Co-Designers: Shelley Rodrigo, Megan McKittrick, Matt Beale, Amy Adcock, Sarah Spangler, & Marquise Twitty
2011-2015

The Learn-2-Learn (L2L) Game is a gameful learning environment with basic student success strategies, self-efficacy activities, and write-to-learn prompts. We are developing a game architecture to motivate students and support materials to help faculty implement small L2L activities to courses that are already designed.

Student Participants

  • Marquise Twitty, Undergraduate Researcher, Game Narrative Scope and Structure Research and Design, Spring & Fall 2014, Spring 2015
  • Katelyn Kietlinski, Undergraduate Researcher, Secondary Scholarship as well as Usability and Formative Assessment study, Fall 2013-Spring 2014

Financial Support

  • Old Dominion University College of Arts and Letters, Social Science Research Center Fellow, Spring 2015
    Learning to Learn: There’s A Game for That
    Course reassign time during the Spring 2015 to continue preparing an National Science Foundation Cyberlearning grant proposal. The grant application is to develop a Learn-to-Learn gameful learning environment (L2L Game). Awardee, 3 credit hour course reassign time and $1000 for travel and project materials.
  • Old Dominion University, Improving Interdisciplinary Writing Action Project
    Learn-to-Learn (L2L) Game: Adding Learn-to-Write Modules for STEM Disciplines
    Faculty are charged with the responsibility of teaching course content while fostering effective writing skills that lead to academic, professional, and civic success. Games can cultivate a lowrisk setting that promotes experimentation, problem-solving strategies, and collaboration. To facilitate improved writing in the STEM disciplines, we are adding scaffolded writing activities to an existing digital gaming environment. The environment is customizable, allowing faculty to associate specific writing skills with relevant course projects all the while providing students with access to intrinsically motivating activities that integrate writing skills training with their written assignments. Principal Investigator, $19,850

  • Old Dominion University Office of Research, Faculty Proposal Preparation (FP3) Award, Spring 2014
    Learning to Learn: There’s An App for That
    Course reassign time during the Spring 2014 to prepare an National Science Foundation Cyberlearning grant proposal. The grant application is to develop a Learn-to-Learn mobile learning environment (L2L App). Awardee, 3 credit hour course reassign time.
  • Old Dominion University Center for Learning and Technology, Faculty Innovator Grant, 2013-2014
    The Learning to Learn Game: Traditional Teaching Levels Up
    Designed a game that allows faculty to associate specific learning skills with relevant course content while providing students with access and motivation to engage with alternative learning skills content. Co-Principal Investigator with Megan McKittrick and Matt Beale, $3,000

Index

Learning Support

Being Present

Note Taking

Reading

Student Academic Services

Studying

Syllabus

Mid/End-of-Course Activities

Research & Writing Support

Identify a Topic/Problem/Question

Find & Track Secondary Sources

Read & Evaluate Secondary Sources

Synthesize Ideas & Sources

Draft & (Peer) Review

Polish & Present a Final Project

Reflect

Living Support

Managing Time

Sleeping

Student Support Services

Research & Writing Support

Identify a Topic/Problem/Question

Deciding and narrowing a research topic are important first steps in the research process. Remember, the topic you choose will likely be the focus of your work for a considerable chunk of the semester. Use these activities to help you find a topic you’ll enjoy researching and that fits the parameters of your assignment.

Find & Track Secondary Sources

Finding the sources you need to conduct your research involves a variety of methods. Researchers usually locate sources from more than one place and often examine and cite numerous sources to help support their arguments. Keeping track of your searches and sources is crucial to effective and efficient research. Use these activities to help you get started with finding and tracking your secondary sources.

Read & Evaluate Secondary Sources

Once you’ve found some secondary sources, you need to read and annotate (take notes) them as well as evaluate them for quality and relevance. You’ll likely be working with a lot of sources, so take notes on each source to keep track of what you’ll eventually synthesize for your support. Also, don’t waste your time on sources that aren’t high quality or that don’t help you meet your research agenda. Use the activities below to help you develop solid note-taking techniques and evaluative skills.

Synthesize Ideas & Sources

After reading, annotating, and evaluating each individual source, you need to begin synthesizing your sources. Strong and clear synthesis of secondary sources signals that you have a solid understanding of the research themes related to your topic. Doing so is no easy feat. Use the activities in this section to help you get started with identifying the similarities and differences across the wide body of research you are examining.

Draft & (Peer) Review

Beginning the drafting process can be daunting. At some point, however, you have to commit some words to paper…or the screen. And, the process doesn’t stop there. Once you have a draft, you need to obtain audience feedback on your writing and critically review how well you’ve organized, developed, and focused the ideas in your paper. Luckily, we have a bunch of activities to help you with these steps in the process.

Polish & Present a Final Project

After reviewing and addressing any major revisions in your work, you’ll need to make time to polish your work by carefully proofreading and making stylistic improvements. Also, at this stage, you might be expected to share your research in presentation form. The activities in this section provide you with some strategies for polishing your work and adapting it to a variety of presentation styles and mediums.

Reflect

Reflecting on your writing allows you to observe your strengths and challenges as a writer. Perhaps, more importantly, reflecting on your work gives you an opportunity to see the progression in your thinking as well as all the hard work you’ve accomplished. Whether reflecting through words or visuals or sound–or a combination of these modes–you can think through your process and identify the things that worked and things that didn’t.

Living Support

Managing Time

Work, school, friends, eating, sleeping…there are a lot of events and requirements to keep organized. Consider using these activities to help manage your time and energy.

Sleeping

Research shows that sleeping, or lack thereof, affects learning. Use these activities to help your sleep so that you perform better in your classes.

Student Support Services

Most colleges and universities have a variety of services to help students manage life outside of the classroom. Use these activities to help you explore and learn more about these services.

Learning Support

Being Present

Whether in class or while doing homework, use these activities to help you focus in the moment.

Note Taking

These are strategies for taking notes while you are reading a text or listening to a lecture.

Reading

These strategies not only help you read, but they also help you to better engage with the content so that you learn the materials.

Student Academic Services

Most institutions of higher education have a variety of support services to help you with your classes. Learn about what support services are available at your institution, and start planning when and where you might use these services.

Studying

Reading and listening and doing homework are not enough to succeed in college. You need to engage with the material (on a regular basis, not just before a test!).

Syllabus

The syllabus is an important document that outlines the path to success in a given course. Use these activities to help navigate your course syllabi.

Mid/End-of-Course Activities

If you’d like to remember what you’ve learned past a mid-term or final exam, consider doing some of these longer-term reflection and engagement activities.