Sleeping

Researching Sleep Hours

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Luc De Leeuw

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Luc De Leeuw

1. Some people need 9 hours; others only need 6. For two weeks, record the following each day:

  • hours slept the previous night
  • how you felt during the day

2. At the end of two weeks, draft a response to the following:

  • How many hours of sleep do you think you need? Which days demonstrate this is the appropriate amount?
  • What can you do to ensure you get those hours of sleep each night?

3. Upload your written response.

Sleeping a Whole 8 Hours

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Angelina :)

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Angelina 🙂

1. Time for an experiment: for one week (including the weekend), be in bed (without stimulants like backlit devices or homework) for at least 8 hours. Sleep may or may not come during that time, but your body is resting in bed for 8 hours a night.

2. At the end of that week, draft a response to the following questions:

  • How did you feel at the beginning, middle, and end of the week? Is this too much time? Too little?
  • Did you have trouble falling asleep? If so, why? Stimulants? Stress/worry? The bedtime?
  • What can you do to ensure you spend enough time in bed?

3. Upload your written response.

Meditating to Help Sleeping

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Katey

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Katey

1. Try taking a nap and/or meditating for 15 minutes at least four days a week. Do so in the earlier in the day; avoid napping in the late afternoon/evening.

To meditate, all you have to do is sit/lay quietly, and keep your mind focused on your breathing.

2. After a week where you napped or meditated at least three times, list what days, times, and whether you napped or meditated. Describe how this process affected your productivity and mood for the remainder of the day.

3. Post your reflection.

Preparing to Sleep

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by le luxographe

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by le luxographe

1. From the list below, identify any activity you engage in at least an hour before bed.

  • Watching TV
  • Browsing the internet
  • Reading from a backlit device (like a computer/tablet/phone)
  • Doing homework
  • Playing video games
  • Heavy snacking/eating
  • Drinking too many fluids
  • Smoking
  • Drinking alcohol
  • Working

2. Select replacement activities from the list below:

  • Hungry? Try a few slices of turkey or a low-fat yogurt to hold you over until morning.

  • Thirsty? Don’t deprive yourself, but avoid fluids before bed; otherwise, it may result in frequent bathroom trips.

  • Bored? Read a book, comic, or article (light reading; no homework and no backlit devices), and stick to a specific bedtime routine: wash your face, brush your teeth, floss, etc.

3. Try better preparing for sleep for 2-3 nights. Describe your sleep suckers and reflect on how well some replacement activities worked for you. Post your reflection.

Mid-/End-of-Course, Sleeping and Learning

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Robert S. Donovan

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Robert S. Donovan

1. Research your sleeping for four weeks.

2. Each day reflect on the time you slept, your energy levels, and your experiences in class and/or while doing homework.

3. After four weeks, look back at your notes. Look for connections or trends associated with your sleeping and learning. Reflect upon what you learned about your sleeping and learning patterns.

4. Share your reflection.

Sleeping affects learning! Check out “‘Memory Pinball’ and Other Reasons You Need a Nap.”