Managing Time

Mapping Your Week

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Rob and Stephanie Levy

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Rob and Stephanie Levy

1. Use the blank weekly schedule and map out your week. Fill in the times you work, sleep, and attend class. Fill in the time you eat, exercise, and participate in family or civic engagements.

2. Now build in your study time for each class; remember, it is generally assumed you will be studying 2-3 hours outside of class for every 1 hour you are inside class.

3. Once you have your study slots filled, outline the specific course work you will be doing during that time (reading, revising notes, writing a paper, etc.).

4. Upload your resulting week schedule.

Reflecting on Your Weekly Schedule

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Jesus Climent

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Jesus Climent

1. While working through a week that you have mapped in the “Mapping Your Week,” keep track of when you stayed on task as outlined and when you did not.

2. At the end of the week, go back and write a brief reflection on what helped you stay on task and what were the types of activities or events that distracted you from your task. Discuss how you would schedule your week differently to be more successful the next time.

3. Upload your reflection and, if necessary, a revise weekly schedule.

Developing a Project Schedule

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by I am I.A.M.

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by I am I.A.M.

1. Pull out and closely (re)read and assignment prompt for a larger assignment.

2. List every single activity you must complete to finish the larger assignment. Try to break everything down into its smallest component. Be sure to include the following types of steps:

3. Put the first activity you must complete (closely read the assignment prompt) at the top of the list with today’s date next to it. Put the last activity (submitting the assignment) at the very bottom of the list with the due date next to it. Look at your calendar and assign internal deadlines to the remainder of the steps. Keep the following tips in mind:

  • do not plan to work on the same project for more than two hours at a time
  • leave time to let someone else read a draft of your project and time for you to make revisions
  • leave time to proofread, copyedit, and check for citations as separate activities (finish your project at least a few days early)

4. Share your schedule with a classmate or friend. Ask if they have suggestions on how to break up the assignment and/or how to schedule your work processes.

5. Revise your project schedule based on the feedback.

6. Upload your resulting project schedule.

Mid-/End-of-Course, Reflecting on Time Management Strategies

Mid-course

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by giuseppe

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by giuseppe

1. Follow a weekly schedule, like the you developed during the “SURVIVE: Mapping Your Week” activity, for at least four weeks.

2. Write a response to the following questions:

  • Where is most of your time going (social time, workout time, work, or class work)? Why?
  • Do you think you’re spending too much time in one area? Is it making other areas of your life suffer? How and/or why?
  • What changes can you make to accomplish a more balanced schedule?

3. Upload your reflection.

End-of-course

1. Examine the weekly schedules you developed and revised throughout the semester.

2.. Write a response to the following:

  • What changes did you make to your schedule over the semester, and what impact did those changes make on each area of your life (exercising, working, doing homework, socializing, sleeping, etc.)?
  • What will you do to improve time management in the upcoming semesters?

3. Upload your reflection.