Final Project

Present your Project Ignite Style (5 Minutes)

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Sarah Ross

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Sarah Ross

Ignite style presentations are only five minutes long; they include 20 PowerPoint or Keynote slides that are set to auto-advance every 15 seconds.

Actiivity

1. As a way to develop a concise presentation of your research project, develop an Ignite style presentation. Use the resources on this page to help.

2. Share-out options:

  • Upload your slides to Google Drive or Slideshare. Include the draft of your script in the notes area of each slide. Be sure the uploaded document is viewable to the public. Copy/paste the link to your presentation below in the comments thread.
  • Record your presentation (don’t forget that the slides need to auto-advance every 15 seconds). You might record yourself using something like Screencast-O-matic, Open Broadcaster Software (and then upload it to Google Drive or YouTube) or VoiceThread.  Be sure the uploaded presentation is viewable to the public. Copy/paste the link to your presentation below in the comments thread.

Citation Check

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Judy Baxter

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Judy Baxter

“Works Cited” or “References” lists at the end of your research papers only include resources that you actually cited within the context of your essay. Before submitting your final essay, be sure to verify your citations.

Activity

  1. Print out a draft of your paper. Separate your end-of-paper bibliography from the rest of the essay.
  2. Carefully read through your essay. Stop at EVERY spot where you reference information that is not your own (summary, paraphrase, or direct quote). For each location, check the following:
    • In the same sentence, do you introduce the summary, paraphrase, or direct quotation (not just “dump in” a quote)?
    • Do you adequately summarize or paraphrase, and/or do you include quotation marks?
    • In the same sentence, do you provide a correctly styled (e.g., MLA, APA, IEEE, Chicago, etc.) in-text citation?
    • Do you connect the information from the summary, paraphrase, and/or quote back to your larger argument (this may happen in the next sentence)?
    • Is the complete bibliographic citation included in your final list? Put a check by the entry on the end-of-paper bibliography so you know you have used that source. If it is not there, add the full bibliographic citation.
  3. After you have carefully read through your entire essay and checked all of your in-text citations, look at your end-of-paper bibliography. Are there any remaining citations that were not in your essay? If so, delete them from your list.
  4. Share-out: Write a reflection of this activity. What types of revisions did you make? Post your reflection below to the comments thread.

Tightening Up your Prose

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by tfengreen

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by tfengreen

Activity

  1. Read about the Paramedic Method of making your writing more concise (consider searching for a few different examples of the method).
  2. Make a new copy of the current draft of your paper. Get a total word count of your draft (not including end-of-paper citations). Put your “before” word count at the top of the page.
  3. Apply the Paramedic Method to your current draft.
  4. After you’ve applied the Paramedic Method, get a new word count. Put the “after” word count at the top of the page.
  5. At the bottom of your draft, reflect on what you learned about yourself as a writer and as an editor. Reflect on how/why the draft is better (or not)?
  6. Share-out: Copy/paste your reflection below in the comments thread.

Specific Editing Strategy

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by george.bremer

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by george.bremer

Activity

  1. Google “Editing,” “Copyediting,” and/or “Proofreading.”
  2. Find a “checklist” or “guideline” that you have not used before.
  3. Follow the checklist or guideline with your own project.
  4. Now, write a reflection in which you discuss your responses to the checklist or guideline. What revisions will you make as a result of this process? Will you use this checklist or guideline again? Why or why not?
  5. Share-out: Copy/paste your reflection below, and be sure to include a link to the checklist or guideline.

Infographic Presentation

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Tanu Anand

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Tanu Anand

Create an infographic presentation for your project with a free-to-use digital application like Piktochart, infogr.am, or visualize.me. You can also check out this article for other free apps.

Activity

  1. Brainstorm a list of the main takeaways of your project.
  2. Brainstorm a list of interesting insights, facts, and/or statistics from your project.
  3. Now try to summarize each takeaway, insight, etc., in phrases of 2-3 words.
  4. Review some infographic examples on the above-listed sites.
  5. Look for a template that fits your project thematically.
  6. Share-out: Create your own infographic and post a link to your resulting presentation in the comments thread below.

Five-Minute Flash Presentation

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Sarah Ross

Activity

  1. Choose 10 images that represent your project.
  2. Develop a visual that tells the “story” of your project (use a presentation tool like PowerPoint, Prezi, Keynote, VoiceThread, Slideshare, Google Slides, etc.).
  3. Do not include any words on the slides. Be sure to include a citation for each image in the “notes” area of each slide.
  4. Write a 30-second blurb for each image (you should end up with 5 minutes of material).
  5. Record yourself giving your presentation (use an audio-recording tool like VoiceThread, Screencast-O-Matic, Open Broadcaster Software, Snagit, etc.).
  6. Share-out: Upload your presentation somewhere like YouTube, Vimeo, or in Google Drive. Provide a link to your resulting presentation in the comments thread below.

 

Peer Read-through Aloud for Sentence-Level Copyediting

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Lotte Grønkjær

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Lotte Grønkjær

This activity is designed to help you catch sentence-level grammar and mechanics errors. Use this strategy after you have finished developing and organizing your project’s content.

Activity

  1. Find a peer, friend, or family member willing to read the content of your project out loud.
  2. If possible, print a copy of your project for your reader and yourself. If not, you and your reader will both need a device that will facilitate viewing your project.
  3. Ask your reviewer to read your work out loud in a conversational voice with a natural cadence.
  4. Listen closely to the reading.
    • Listen for phrases that sound confusing.
    • Listen for instances where the reader might stumble over your writing.
    • Listen for word choice concerns.
    • Listen for subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement.
    • Listen for any awkward-sounding phrasing.
  5. As you listen, make notes on your hard copy or on your computer.
  6. Share-out: Highlight an edit that you make, take a picture or screenshot of it, and post it below in the comments thread.

Backwards Review for Sentence-Level Copyediting

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Margrit

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Margrit

This activity is designed to help you catch sentence-level grammar and mechanics errors. Use this strategy after you have finished developing and organizing your project’s content.

Activity

  1. Review your project or paper backwards. If possible, print your work to do so.
  2. Start at the very end of the project, and work your way to the very beginning.
  3. Read sentence by sentence until you end with the very first sentence.
  4. Read out loud for best results.
  5. Share-out: Highlight an edit that you make, take a picture or screenshot of it, and post it below to the comments thread.

Recorded Oral Presentation

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Cesar Garza

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Cesar Garza

Activity

1. Develop an oral and visual presentation of your project (using a tool like PowerPoint, Prezi, Keynote, etc.).

2. Record a video presentation of you speaking while sharing your visuals. You might record yourself using something like Screencast-O-matic (and then upload it to Google Drive or YouTube) or VoiceThread.

3. Upload your presentation somewhere like YouTube, Vimeo, or in Google Drive; make sure your uploaded document is shared/viewable to the public.

4. Share-out: Provide a link to your resulting presentation in the comments thread below.

Tips & Suggestions for Presentations

Recording Options

 

Executive Summary Audio Postcard

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by hjl

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by hjl

Activity

1. Find one image that represents your project/argument. Creat a presentation introducing your project by either writing 300-400 words or orally recording 3-5 minutes of talking out loud. Be sure to include the project’s:

  • main thesis, and
  • main take-aways.

2. Post your image and text in a Google Doc or image and audio file at SoundCloud.

3. Share-out: Upload a document with your image and text, or provide a link to your digital file in the comments thread below.