Identify Themes

 Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by  StephenZacharias


Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by StephenZacharias

Analyzing primary and secondary data and then making sense of it is difficult; it is not a process you can rush. Try to identify similarities and differences by “wading through” your data.

Activity

  1. Read through all of your primary or secondary data (focus on one or the other, not both at once).
  2. Identify similarities/themes you see. On a separate piece of paper, write those down with a brief description of what they are.
  3. Wait at least one day.
  4. Read through your data again. Does your list of similarities/themes still seem relevant? Update it (keep a copy of the older version). Also note any radical differences or outliers.
  5. Wait another day.
  6. Start with your list of themes and their descriptions/definitions. Now read through your data and code/annotate/note where these themes show up.
  7. Code/annotate any extreme differences or outliers (might they have similarities to one another?).
  8. If you have the time, share your list of themes and their descriptions/definitions with a friend. Ask that person to try coding some of your data. Did he or she mark the same sections? Did she or he notice different trends?
  9. Reflect on this process. Describe what you did. Discuss what you learned about the data. What are you excited about? What do you want to know more about?
  10. Share-out: Copy/paste or upload your reflection below in the comments thread.

 

 

2 thoughts on “Identify Themes

  1. Nurettin Yigit Gultekin

    Read through all of your primary or secondary data (focus on one or the other, not both at once).
    Identify similarities/themes you see. On a separate piece of paper, write those down with a brief description of what they are. The sources are mainly related to sportcars and their design.

    ONE DAY LATER

    The data seem to be still similar however I realized that the data are more common in terms of the design process.

    ONE DAY LATER

    Finite Element Analysis :
    Frame Design

    I am really excited to see that all of my sources have the similar approaches. I feel like even thorough I diversified my sources , they are all giving the same result.

  2. Claire

    Reflection

    This exercise helped me realize what information was important and what information was not. I used data from two psychology articles that examined teen drinking. I found that certain statistics were more important in regards to the psychological aspect of drinking, while the information in the other article was focused on rates of accidents, like how often they occur, where they occur, and who they happen to. The first day I gathered the information from both articles. At that point I thought all of the information was equally important. The second day I realized the information from the first article was more relevant to the theme ff psychological factors in teen drinking. The next day I had a friend look over my research and data collected from these articles. She thought that both of the information was important and related to each other, but the psychological data was more relevant to my theme.

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